What Would You Like With Your WT?

Wearable Technologies

Image: WallpaperHDFree.com

“Wearable Technology” is coming! It is coming in all shapes and forms. Whether you are a gadgeteer, a technologist, a fashionista, a carbon saver, or just walk the streets, you have a stake in what happens here…

From my perspective, this is a chance for technology to do some things right, right from the start.

Technology

  • Don’t make my smartphone do ALL the work. It is the hub, but protect my battery and help my pants stay up by keeping mobiles light and avoiding multiple battery packs. Distributed? Peer to peer chats where needed?
  • Standards and interoperability? Please don’t create a closed ecosystem. I don’t want to have to change my pacemaker because my smartphone died
  • Integrate, integrate, integrate! Create a whole, not a sum of the parts. I want a solution and not an architecture to plug things into. I do enough of that at work

Usability

  • Make my experience soar. Make things clean, easy to connect and easy to use. Please don’t fry my brain
  • Make information readily available at the right-time. Don’t bombard me in real-time until I ask. I have trouble concentrating as it is
  • Talk to the fashion people. I may be a geek, but I don’t want to look like one all the time. I prefer the look and feel of the image on the left.
  • Allow a device to charge others. I have run out of USB ports, especially for anything that is inside my body
  • Please make the charging wireless. My desk is a mess of wires; not sure I want to replicate it on my body

Save The Earth

  • Make use of all the things that have been touted – solar, piezo, etc. If I have to move and be in the sun to make my gadgets work, I can avoid the couch potato experience

Security And Privacy

  • Please use biometric security or whatever it takes. While I will be delighted to know my pulse after running at top speed for 3 minutes, I am not sure I want the person on the park bench to know it
  • Please have a clear visual indicator that cannot be disabled. I REALLY want to know when I am being recorded in video or audio. I need to be very careful what I do online; please leave me some space in the offline world
  • I am interested in spying on myself and myself alone. Help me not spy on other people and protect me when somebody else wants to spy on me. Difficult? Well, the size of this market with and without this feature would be an interesting clue…

There are choices in front of all the firms looking to get into this field, and believe me, there are a lot of them. The successful ones should be the ones that care about what we want. The question is if we care enough about what we want to make it a reality.

What do the 9-to-whatevers think?

The Journey From Services To IP?

Made In Indian IT Service IndustryThe Indian IT Services industry has been one of the wonders of the world over the last couple of decades, growing from nothing to $100 Billion in that time. However, today, the industry seems to be caught-up in it’s own success. With the loss of the cost play as a long term strategy, and the movement of the IT landscape towards everything on the cloud (the conclusions in this article by  are a bit drastic, IMHO, but the points are valid), the industry needs to have a long hard look at what the future holds.

A recent event report by Ray Wang that talked about IP motivated me to flesh out my thoughts on this topic. Over the past few years, this has been an oft-repeated discussion with folks at multiple firms (mostly within the BFSI sector) with interesting thought patterns emerging.

There is a large amount of trepidation in these firms with regards to creating intellectual property. The few internally developed products have not provided the returns. Even the ones purchased externally are not hitting headlines. The ROI has just not compared with the returns coming from services making it a low priority in tough times. There is also concern about competing with the customer (the customer would not want to pass knowhow which could end up in the vendors own products). The firms just don’t seem to trust their knowledge levels, execution capability and selling skills enough.

To get around this, the vendors need to think outside the box.

One feature of enterprise software (especially internal software, which is bread and butter for the service industry) is the utter lack of thought put into user experience, and to an extent, sustainable design. Zia Patel has eloquently talked about how India can capitalize on its back room innovation skills to create IP. This niche can then be exploited by the industry to create a differentiation to their services as well as products.

Another thought is to work with the startups in India. I know of several startups which began with product roadmaps. To fund these fruits of passion, they began to do services. Now they are in the “next payroll syndrome” and are unable/unwilling to chase their dreams. With their strong balance sheets, the large companies can create an eco-system of co-dependency that will help both ends of the market. There is a start in this area, but I am still not sure that the needed focus has been brought yet.

In summation, the industry needs to start looking at the future much harder than it is today. Yes, it needs to build up strong expertise across verticals and it needs to ensure that the relationships are created and nurtured. But, that is now a basic requirement, not an objective. As for the individual firms, they tend to follow each other, which reduces the chances of any real innovation happening in the industry.

Its time for the individual firms to stop focusing on each other and start focusing on themselves. What do the 9-to-whatevers think?

Does Math Have a Context?

Basic MathThroughout my engineering days as well as professional life, I always liked math. It has a certain cleanliness to it that I could not find elsewhere. Of course there came a point where it took more effort than I intended to put in to understand the intricacies. However, everything I learnt before that is still close to my heart.

So, when I decided to indulge in a newfound passion to create masterpieces for the mobile world, I naturally turned to math. The idea was to create something that would help kids understand, enjoy and excel at basic mathematics. The more I researched in this field, the more confused I got.

I realized that our learning process for different subjects is different. We learn the best when we learn within a context. Language is taught to children using action words which they can easily identify with. Right up to our learning in professional lives, our learning all comes with context. However, math is still taught in a very abstract way.

We are taught that 2+2=4. This is a “fact”. We are taught the process of solving this problem and how to extend it to other problems. However, there is no context. There is no storification. No wonder that children who do not immediately identify the beauty do not really like the subject even if they are good at it. A food for thought article I read from PBS prompted me to write this.

Can anything be done about this? Can math be storified? Can we create a context around basic math to stoke the imagination of children? In fact, does math have a context?

What do the 9-to-whatevers think?