Is Globalization Tenable?

Globalization is here! Over the last couple of decades, the barriers to exploring and exploiting remote markets have continually eroded. Aided by the web and other factors, even small firms and individuals are able to create and tap clients the world over.

However, is this going to continue to flourish or even be tenable in the future? That, in my opinion, has become a good question over the last few years. The momentum is good, but the momentum arrestors have become quite active now.

Regulators! They are the ones playing spoil-sport. Local regulation has always been as much about populism as protection. Jingoism and parochialism have ruled the day. The topics have also run the gamut – one of the newer entrants being data”.

Regulations around data now abound. Under the labels of privacy and protection (worthy goals in themselves), various countries around the world have created a dis-balanced situation. Essentially, the story is going to “we welcome all your data and we will process it, but our data is not allowed to leave our borders”. In some cases, this is not only for data that can identify individuals, but also for transactional data. For highly regulated industries like banking and pharmaceuticals, this can create havoc. Can other data intensive industries, even e-tailing be far behind?

What is the impact?

  • If data cannot be transferred across borders for processing, global systems become a no-no. Local systems across the globe are not the most cost-effective or the most effective solutions
  • Home countries wish to/need to regulate organizations as a whole – evaluate risks as a whole, monitor for not-nice things, etc. If the data cannot leave individual country boundaries, this is simply not possible. A case of regulations ensuring violation of other regulations
  • The cost of conforming to different regulations in different countries reduces the motivation to globalize in the first place

So, what is going to happen? At some point, the global view will need to be restored. For this, the regulators might wake up and realize the cost that their parochialism is extracting (fat chance?). One other possibility is if enough organizations from an industry actually decide to move out of a country that becomes too heavily regulated threatening a paucity of services (not nice, but has happened before). Not sure what the action will be, but I am convinced that the globalization train will get over this bump.

Sure, 9-to-whatevers, feel free to call me an optimist…

My Internet of Things?

 

Welcome Apple! The Homekit is the latest entry into a crowded world of home automation. Along with big names like Google, Samsung, Comcast…, this market is full of small manufacturers who have their own controlling apps. In fact an acquaintance just created a device and an app using his own standards.

Given the projected size of the market (Gartner:$300B by 2020), the commercial interest is completely understandable. But will this market live up to it’s promise? In the home sector, it will depend upon it’s usability.

As a potential end user, I am starting to get confused. Should I buy every device from the same manufacturer based on the promise of integration? Should I buy what I want and use individual apps? Should I wait for Apple to release more information? Should I wait until standards start appearing? Should I just give up now?

As a potential end user, I would like to buy what I want and be able to plug it into whatever controlling application I choose to use. I can buy a mobile phone and choose any provider, right? I would like the device to be discovered and configured. I would like analysis on the data from the device (if appropriate) and I would like to be able to intuitively control it (again, if appropriate). And then, there is the issue of security, but let us leave aside for the purposes of this article.

I believe that the strength of the manufacturer comes from the work the device does and how well and efficiently it does it. I believe that the strength of the integrator comes from the usability of the controlling application. How easy is it for me to find a particular device, control it’s features. How well does the application perform the analysis and show me results. The strength of either does not lie in limiting my choices through control of the eco-system.

I understand that standardization is a difficult exercise. I understand that the commercial aspect should and will take precedence. But, my understanding also is that the long term commercial benefits will be better if standardization is achieved earlier.

I am sure Apple will blow me away with it’s usability. I hope it does. I hope it succeeds. But, I also hope it works with everybody else to create an open eco-system, not a closed one. Right now, it is way too hard for the end user to make sense of the Internet of Things.

What do the 9-to-whatevers think?

What Would You Like With Your WT?

Wearable Technologies

Image: WallpaperHDFree.com

“Wearable Technology” is coming! It is coming in all shapes and forms. Whether you are a gadgeteer, a technologist, a fashionista, a carbon saver, or just walk the streets, you have a stake in what happens here…

From my perspective, this is a chance for technology to do some things right, right from the start.

Technology

  • Don’t make my smartphone do ALL the work. It is the hub, but protect my battery and help my pants stay up by keeping mobiles light and avoiding multiple battery packs. Distributed? Peer to peer chats where needed?
  • Standards and interoperability? Please don’t create a closed ecosystem. I don’t want to have to change my pacemaker because my smartphone died
  • Integrate, integrate, integrate! Create a whole, not a sum of the parts. I want a solution and not an architecture to plug things into. I do enough of that at work

Usability

  • Make my experience soar. Make things clean, easy to connect and easy to use. Please don’t fry my brain
  • Make information readily available at the right-time. Don’t bombard me in real-time until I ask. I have trouble concentrating as it is
  • Talk to the fashion people. I may be a geek, but I don’t want to look like one all the time. I prefer the look and feel of the image on the left.
  • Allow a device to charge others. I have run out of USB ports, especially for anything that is inside my body
  • Please make the charging wireless. My desk is a mess of wires; not sure I want to replicate it on my body

Save The Earth

  • Make use of all the things that have been touted – solar, piezo, etc. If I have to move and be in the sun to make my gadgets work, I can avoid the couch potato experience

Security And Privacy

  • Please use biometric security or whatever it takes. While I will be delighted to know my pulse after running at top speed for 3 minutes, I am not sure I want the person on the park bench to know it
  • Please have a clear visual indicator that cannot be disabled. I REALLY want to know when I am being recorded in video or audio. I need to be very careful what I do online; please leave me some space in the offline world
  • I am interested in spying on myself and myself alone. Help me not spy on other people and protect me when somebody else wants to spy on me. Difficult? Well, the size of this market with and without this feature would be an interesting clue…

There are choices in front of all the firms looking to get into this field, and believe me, there are a lot of them. The successful ones should be the ones that care about what we want. The question is if we care enough about what we want to make it a reality.

What do the 9-to-whatevers think?

The Journey From Services To IP?

Made In Indian IT Service IndustryThe Indian IT Services industry has been one of the wonders of the world over the last couple of decades, growing from nothing to $100 Billion in that time. However, today, the industry seems to be caught-up in it’s own success. With the loss of the cost play as a long term strategy, and the movement of the IT landscape towards everything on the cloud (the conclusions in this article by  are a bit drastic, IMHO, but the points are valid), the industry needs to have a long hard look at what the future holds.

A recent event report by Ray Wang that talked about IP motivated me to flesh out my thoughts on this topic. Over the past few years, this has been an oft-repeated discussion with folks at multiple firms (mostly within the BFSI sector) with interesting thought patterns emerging.

There is a large amount of trepidation in these firms with regards to creating intellectual property. The few internally developed products have not provided the returns. Even the ones purchased externally are not hitting headlines. The ROI has just not compared with the returns coming from services making it a low priority in tough times. There is also concern about competing with the customer (the customer would not want to pass knowhow which could end up in the vendors own products). The firms just don’t seem to trust their knowledge levels, execution capability and selling skills enough.

To get around this, the vendors need to think outside the box.

One feature of enterprise software (especially internal software, which is bread and butter for the service industry) is the utter lack of thought put into user experience, and to an extent, sustainable design. Zia Patel has eloquently talked about how India can capitalize on its back room innovation skills to create IP. This niche can then be exploited by the industry to create a differentiation to their services as well as products.

Another thought is to work with the startups in India. I know of several startups which began with product roadmaps. To fund these fruits of passion, they began to do services. Now they are in the “next payroll syndrome” and are unable/unwilling to chase their dreams. With their strong balance sheets, the large companies can create an eco-system of co-dependency that will help both ends of the market. There is a start in this area, but I am still not sure that the needed focus has been brought yet.

In summation, the industry needs to start looking at the future much harder than it is today. Yes, it needs to build up strong expertise across verticals and it needs to ensure that the relationships are created and nurtured. But, that is now a basic requirement, not an objective. As for the individual firms, they tend to follow each other, which reduces the chances of any real innovation happening in the industry.

Its time for the individual firms to stop focusing on each other and start focusing on themselves. What do the 9-to-whatevers think?

Does Math Have a Context?

Basic MathThroughout my engineering days as well as professional life, I always liked math. It has a certain cleanliness to it that I could not find elsewhere. Of course there came a point where it took more effort than I intended to put in to understand the intricacies. However, everything I learnt before that is still close to my heart.

So, when I decided to indulge in a newfound passion to create masterpieces for the mobile world, I naturally turned to math. The idea was to create something that would help kids understand, enjoy and excel at basic mathematics. The more I researched in this field, the more confused I got.

I realized that our learning process for different subjects is different. We learn the best when we learn within a context. Language is taught to children using action words which they can easily identify with. Right up to our learning in professional lives, our learning all comes with context. However, math is still taught in a very abstract way.

We are taught that 2+2=4. This is a “fact”. We are taught the process of solving this problem and how to extend it to other problems. However, there is no context. There is no storification. No wonder that children who do not immediately identify the beauty do not really like the subject even if they are good at it. A food for thought article I read from PBS prompted me to write this.

Can anything be done about this? Can math be storified? Can we create a context around basic math to stoke the imagination of children? In fact, does math have a context?

What do the 9-to-whatevers think?

Through The Looking Glass

secretlondonglasses_previewFinally, it happened. I had to get my first pair of reading glasses a couple of months ago. I got the lightest pair I could find given what I had read and heard about comfort levels.

I need them to read and read only. I am absolutely fine watching TV or moving about the house without them. In fact, the lenses distort the perception for anything beyond reading. What surprised me were some of the behaviors I developed.

As time moved along, I realized that I was leaving them on for some other activities. Even though the view was distorted, I was not conscious of this and went about my business. This happened until something made me realize the glasses were on and I removed them.

This got me thinking! What kind of glasses do I carry around with me in life? All perception is necessarily through the lenses of my collective experiences, but what distortions and prejudices have crept in that I am not conscious of? How aware do I need to be to have an open mind?

Applying this to a professional setting, do our built-up biases unconsciously drive our actions and decisions? What needs to happen for us to realize that we are carrying this baggage and for us to unload it? Mind you, this is not about ignoring all previous experiences. This is about identifying and filtering the parts that are appropriate in a given situation. This is about identifying whether the biases are taking us away from where we want to be.

Being aware of this seems to be the first step in building the self-consciousness to identify the biases. This will allow us to be more open to input as well as contrarian evidence. Having a confidante on the team who constantly challenges your leanings and status quo would also help. But, what helps most is our desire to do the right thing.

So, 9-to-whatevers, time to identify the lenses and figure out how to undistort the view? Let me know what you think.

Carrot & Stick

Since time immemorial, I can imagine, there has been a need to motivate people into the “right” behavior.

The first crime ever committed was probably soon after the first settlement was settled and somebody stole a goat from their neighbour.  This resulted in a verdict of “Thou shalt return the goat to thy neighbour; thine goat shall then be cooked for all”.

Punishment was probably easy to implement.  It produced results, was flexible, was (almost) costless and allowed for control of masses within limits of the available technology and philosophy.  However, it must have soon been realized that something was needed to prevent the crimes from occuring in the first place.  Also, there was something needed to make people do good; not just stop them from doing bad.  And this was a gap in the punishment theory.

Bang!  Religion was invented.  Punishment, already invented was included by default.  However, rewards for good behaviour were also included.  This allowed people not only to encourage good behaviour, but also define the parameters of that good behaviour.  Means were very limited though; the rewards could not be distributed freely.  The solution was to provide these rewards in the afterlife (or next life).  This meant no accountability and no feedback.  The required faith also ensured that any gaps in the theory could not be questioned.  A brilliant solution to the motivation problem!

Fast forward to the corporate environment.  The situation does seem to be similar here.  Punishment is easier to implement, easier to execute and requires a lower level of imagination and ability from the managers in-charge.  Loss of employment has always been a credible threat (and remains so today despite the changes in the competitive and HR landscape).

But, how does one motivate good behavior?  This is pretty much a requirement for any organization, not only to thrive, but just to survive in today’s world.  Tools similar to religion were used; lifelong employment, retirement benefits, etc.  This provided the returns on a perennial basis and enabled ‘faith’ and trust in the organization as well as employee.  As the landscape became more competitive, organizations decided they could not afford the largesse.  Individuals also found it more lucrative to sell oneself to the highest bidder in the market.  The lifetime contract was buried once and for all.

So, the conundrum becomes quite accute for the managers of today.  Motivation has become a very complicated field.  Gone are the days when motivation was limited to monetary gains and job security.  Employees as well as organizations concentrate on non-monetary methods.  Also, the expectation of the employees are keeping up with general social trends (they are the same people, are they not!) and demanding instant gratification – and that is if they are not demanding things as incentives before they perform.  Today, the concept of an annual bonus may not make sense due to this.  Even the annual appraisal is being shelved in some brave organizations in favor of a more continuous process.

What is one to do?  In order to succeed themselves, managers (ably led/supported by HR departments), need to break the mold and do things that were unthinkable a few years ago. We need to make the benefits more short term, more flexible (based on the need of the individual). We need to make them more realistic and of real use to our staff. Only then will they give 110% (defined as more that we demand). These are active thoughts in new gen companies such as Google, but for the vast majority of the corporate landscape, the answer continues to be “this will not work for us?”.

Then, the question is what will? Until we redefine the “Carrot” and continue to adjust to the needs to today, we will not be able to get the newer generations to continue working for us. It will take us, the 9-to-whatevers, to open up our imaginations, our biases, our assumptions to really make the worker of today feel Welcome!